Horse sounds a bit more melodic and catchy than previous albums; however, it doesn’t feel pushed or strained at the same time. Slaves On Dope deserve a big congratulations on this album, as they have made steps in the right direction with Horse.

My nu-metal days (not that there were many, really) are long gone, so I have to honestly admit when I got this album for review I had no clue who Slaves On Dope are. And despite this not being a genre I listen to nowadays, maybe with some exceptions like Korn or Linkin Park that stuck with me to these days, I must say I enjoyed Horse a lot more than I have anticipated.

  • Artist: Slaves On Dope
    Album Title: Horse
    Release Date: 07 October 2016
    Label: The ILS Group
    • Electric Kool Aid
    • Health Food and Heroin
    • Freebasing
    • K-Hole
    • Script Writer (feat. Darryl “DMC” McDaniels)
    • Interplanetary Mission (feat. Bill Kelliher)
    • Liquid Sunshine (feat. HR)
    • Codependency (feat. Lee-La Baum)
    • P&P
    • Disco Biscuit

The start to the whole album is pretty energic and brisk with “Electric Kool-Aid,” and just by listening to this first one I was glad I gave this record a try. It is always very welcome when the introduction to album is swift and makes you want to hear more, instead of being disappointed, and this is one of my favourites on this album. The lyrics are great as well, a nice surprise as I always love meaningful lyrics that make you stop and think about what you’re hearing.

Another one that really struck me was “Script Writer” with guest vocals from Darryl “D.M.C” McDaniels. It makes the song stand out, it’s unarguably different with Darryl’s contribution when it comes to the vocals. Not as much when it comes to the music, however. I am not a fan of his style of rapping, but that’s my personal preference, so even if it’s a big plus that the vocals sound very characteristic thanks to Darryl and it caught my attention, I can’t shake the feeling I would like this way more without him.

Script Writer” is not the only song with a guest appearance, there are others. My personal favourite is “Interplanetary Mission,” featuring Mastodon’s Bill Kelliher. I am a big Mastodon fan, so it’s really a no-brainer here. Although the song is a bit slower than most of the others on the album, listening to the overall melody and the very interesting and long solo – which is something a bit uncommon in a Slaves On Dope song on this album – is a proof how well this cooperation went.

Codependency” with Lee-La Baum is also very special due to Lee-La’s vocals; she has a great singing voice which fits perfectly with this music. Good female vocals are always a big plus for me, I literally grew up listening to female-fronted metal, and to this day that kind of music makes up a very big part of what I listen to.

These collaborations add a spark and breath of something fresh and new to the album. The band has its own style and it shows, but it’s also nice to hear that they are up for the occasional change and little bit of experimentation, incorporating different types of musical ideas into their own established style. It’s also interesting to compare these two elements as you listen through the album – the purely SOD songs and those that feature a collaboration in the mix.

With “P&P” I started to feel as if I’ve heard this before. It is great when a band has a certain style, not so good when it makes tracks sometimes so similar that it starts sounding a bit repetitive. Closing track, “Disco Biscuit,” picks things back up with a very enjoyable guitar intro and a singing style that is a bit different, with occasional whispers thrown in here and there, giving you chills and adding a mysterious shivery feel to the song.

Overall, this album is full of energy with a hard and heavy sound. I also love Jason’s vocals, he has a great voice that I find unique and recognizable among others in the genre. If you are into this kind of music, you should certainly give Horse a listen, and I am almost certain you will love this album. Horse sounds a bit more melodic and catchy than previous albums; however, it doesn’t feel pushed or strained at the same time. Slaves On Dope deserve a big congratulations on this album, as they have made steps in the right direction with Horse.


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